i have 4 drain holes on my daysailer 2. Two at the waterline

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i have 4 drain holes on my daysailer 2. Two at the waterline

Postby Don » Mon Jun 22, 2020 2:38 am

one cockpit drain one below that drain and two smaller at the transom waterline. puzzled about the waterline holes.the cockpit drain is obvious . have not yet had the boat in water. anyone able to clear this up for me?
Don
 
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Re: i have 4 drain holes on my daysailer 2. Two at the water

Postby GreenLake » Mon Jun 22, 2020 11:42 am

You have a DSII which is a double hull.

At least one of the drains at the transom is to drain any water that got in the bilge (that is between the hull and the cockpit molding). If you pour some water in the cockpit, you should be able to see where that drains (may have to tip the trailer a bit).

Are any of these drains just duplicated for symmetry? Can't picture it otherwise. However, a picture may help.
~ green ~ lake ~ ~
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Re: i have 4 drain holes on my daysailer 2. Two at the water

Postby Alan » Mon Jun 22, 2020 12:52 pm

My 1980 DSII has three drain holes in the transom. The upper center hole is the cockpit drain. The lower center hole was meant to be a bilge drain but is glassed over, in a way that makes it clear it was done at the factory (this glassed-over hole is fairly common on DSIIs).

The third drain hole, at the portside waterline, opens into the hull cavity at the bottom of the portside seat. The area under the seat, and the starboard seat as well, is open all the way to the front of the boat and down into the bilge between the cockpit floor and the hull.

It sounds like you've got a drain hole for each seat area.

My theory on the drain holes is that the bottom center one was placed there because that's where it was on DSIs. Then someone realized that the DSII cockpit floor is so close to the hull at that point that there's almost no room for water to drain out. The solution was to glass over the hole and place a new one in the open area nearest to the center. That opens into the cavity beneath the seat. I've only got a portside waterline drain plug, but one in each side sounds like a good idea.

If your bottom center drain hole can be opened (some of them weren't glassed over), it might be interesting to look into it with a flashlight and see if there is enough space for water to drain.

GreenLake is right about raising the bow to drain the hull. I jack the front end of my trailer up until the bow is higher than the stern (using a couple of jacks and very secure supports, with the trailer wheels blocked so it can't roll).
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Re: i have 4 drain holes on my daysailer 2. Two at the water

Postby Don » Mon Jun 22, 2020 9:09 pm

Thank you kingly for the input. One drain which I'm sure is the cockpit drain because it's located in the lower basin with a plug. It drains right under the transom to the hull bottom with a small fairing sort of thing. There is one above the cockpit drain but that seems to be too high for a useful cockpit drain, so I imagine it's for a greater flood of cockpit water. There are (you are right) two symmetrical drains one on each side just above the waterline and I guess these would be those hull drains referred to. As I will be keeping the boat at a dock I wonder if the side drains will self bail when at rest and no stern weight. There are two plugs provided for the cockpit drain, lower and upper. My understanding is that the cockpit will drain when at rest to remove rain when unattended. Can there be any certainty of this ? Do not want to sink the boat!
Don
 
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Re: i have 4 drain holes on my daysailer 2. Two at the water

Postby Alan » Wed Jun 24, 2020 11:53 am

Uh-oh, please don't leave the side drains open. They are above the bilge and will drain water into it, if any waves or a boat wake cause the boat to rock so that the drains dip below the waterline. The one with the fairing sounds like the self-bailer, which requires forward motion of the boat to create the low pressure area that causes the self-bailer to self-bail.

I hope to get out to my boat later today. If I can, I'll post photos.
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