Rappahannock Rhapsody

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Rappahannock Rhapsody

Postby tomodda » Thu Oct 07, 2021 6:07 pm

Subtitle: Achy-Breaky Mast

As promised, I'm writing up my latest cruise, for your amusement and possible edification. As long as I'm stealing titles, let's break this report down into the Good, the Bad, and the Ugly....

The Good:

I spent a wonderful week in Urbanna, Virginia, daysailing in style with my 35yo son. We haven't had a father/son sailing trip in ages, but I think he was as thrilled as I was that we were making up for it and then some! I'd rented a nice Airbnb by the river, with full kitchen, king sized bedrooms, deck, and grill. I stocked us up with beer, pork chops, and whiskey. He brought coffee, his fancy travel espresso machine, and pecan pie. What more can you ask for? ;-) I rented a slip at the marina, so once rigged and launched, we didn't have to fuss with the boat for the rest of the week. Just sail!

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Sunset
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And it was grand, everything from peaceful ghosting along in the sunset to reefed-down screaming reaches at the front edge of a storm. But mostly it was wonderful knockabouts in steady 10-12 knot breezes, perfect sailing. A surprise to me - although the Rapp is very pretty, there's no real destination to sail to... but that turned out to be a good thing because each day we just sailed to wherever the wind was good and simply enjoyed our time on the water. But we did discover some nice little nooks and crannies - deserted river beaches, quiet coves, islands. And best of all, a creekside oyster packing plant / seafood restaurant / bar right up the next creek over from Urbanna.

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Seafood + Beer
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Perfect! We sailed over for lunch 3 times over the course of the week. And here's where we get to...
Last edited by tomodda on Thu Oct 07, 2021 10:42 pm, edited 2 times in total.
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Re: Rappahannock Rhapsody

Postby tomodda » Thu Oct 07, 2021 10:38 pm

The Bad:

Chop! The Chesapeake in general, and the Rappahannock in specific is infamous for its wicked chop. Once the wind gets above 18-20kts, you're in for it! Nasty little 2 foot waves with a 4 second period (and that's in the Rapp, it's higher in the Bay). Bamm! Bamm! BAM!!! You no sooner fall off one wave then you're being catapulted off the next. But I've sailed my DS in Chesapeake Chop before, and as long as the seas don't get confused (bouncing off a lee shore or going across a swell) then she can handle it fine. She's so light, she just floats right on over the waves... Ease the helm at the last moment and go over the chop at a diagonal. No sweat - exhilarating, though wet. But that's what crew is for, right? Spray shield ;-)

Except for our last day in town, our last quick sail. Too much wind, overconfidence, "casualness," I didn't take the conditions seriously enough and it nearly cost us everything....
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Re: Rappahannock Rhapsody

Postby tomodda » Thu Oct 07, 2021 10:43 pm

The Ugly:

Our last day was another beautiful sunny one, this time with a 20 knot north wind, gusting 25. As it was the weekend, my wife had come up to stay with us (Urbanna is only 3 hours from home), and brought the dogs and her girl-pal who also loves to sail, and HER Golden Retriever, born a water dog. House-party time! We all had great fun. But this last day.... We decided that we'd sail up to the creekside bar and my wife would drive over there and meet us. I decided that since it was our last sail and we were "only" sailing a mile (dead upwind, of course, so really 3 miles) and we had a good amount of weight in the boat, we wouldn't tie in a reef. Let's really enjoy the great wind! My son took the helm, I crewed, and we sat gal-pal in-between. She's not a great sailor, but knows enough to shift her weight, follow orders, has fun no matter what, and generally doesn't get in the way, and will even haul in on a line when asked to. She's crewed for me before (on lakes) and was allright. Did I mention that we also took my dog (40 lbs, sitting in the lazarette) and her Golden (90 lbs, lying under the cuddy, way up forward)? Between the five of us, dogs and people, plus gear, we were close to 800lbs! Anyway, I only realized that later... First we had to get out of the channel. It basically goes West to East with a dogleg and then a long breakwater. With a North wind, it ought be an easy reach, but of course the wind swirls around the headland so the entire way out of Urbanna was annoyingly upwind. But, no matter, I'm used to sailing in and out of harbors. The DS is so maneuverable, no problem tacking in the channel and dodging the other boats. Right at the dogleg, we had to fight the current and took several boards that only gained us 10-20 feet upwind each, tacking right up against the bulkhead on one side and shoals on the other... A bit of a slog, but as long as we're sailing, I'm good. Both my son and our passenger asked me "why not use the engine?" and I gave my standard answer of "I prefer to save it for when we really need it." Remember, I've got a little electric egg beater, wonderful machine but only has 1 hour of power at full throttle. I'm generally very conservative on the water - one of the few non-stupid things that I did on this day.

But so far, we were doing well. My son was at the helm and tending the mainsheet, I was handling the jib and generally giving orders (that's me!) and our passenger was changing sides smartly on each tack. Dogs were balancing each other out fore and aft, and I was hiking a bit in the gusts, enough to keep us on our feet. Most importantly, my son and I were communicating well, I'd tell him when to head up or ease off, warn him of oncoming puffs and headers, and he was letting me know how the helm felt, how the main was behaving. "Dad, I'm feeling some weather helm!" and I'd ease the vang for him, let the main twist off, trim the jib a bit, adjust the inhaulers and jib car to match the new mains'l set.... After a week sailing together, we were pretty finely tuned.

My son kept a good helm and watched the mainsail leech, and I watched the wind and waves and kept our jib trimmed properly. Once we were out of the dogleg, we found ourselves protected by a half-mile of breakwater upwind and on a nice reach, maybe 70 degrees to the wind. Smooth water, 20 kt wind, we HOWLED, it was a blast! Of course, we soon ran out of breakwater and straight into the chop. "Want me to head up?" Seafood Creek, as we called it, was a mile away dead upwind, so we had a punishing beat ahead of us. By the way, if you're following this little adventure on the NOAA Chart, it's really called Robinson Creek, the whole ensuing mess happened in a shockingly small bit of water. But dead upwind in the teeth of a nasty chop. "Don't head up yet, hold your course, let's get a feel for her in the chop." Wham! Wham! Wham! But we were doing OK, quartering into the chop, moving well. In retrospect, I should have felt how much she was plowing thru the waves with all our weight instead of dancing over them... But we were OK, right? Even though I was taking green spray in my face, my turn to be a sprayshield! Soon I was soaked from head to toe (revenge from all my prior crews), but the water was warm. Even if I had to spit out a mouthful every few seconds. All good, let's try heading up a bit.. BAM! BAM! BAM! Yeah, maybe that's a bit too much, let's keep at a loose reach, say 60 degrees to the wind. We've got all morning, what's an extra few tacks? We were FINE, my son and I had already sailed a rough chop earlier in the week and it was great. We really flew across the river on a single reef that day. One of the local stink-potters warned us that it was too rough that day and we just laughed. Laughed even more when we got back to Harbour and he couldn't believe we had crossed the river. We hadn't even spilled our beer!

But back to today... The 5 of us... We were rapidly reaching out into the middle of the river and the chop was building up to 3+ feet as it had at least 15 miles of fetch to the north. It was like being at the far end of an enormous skinny wave pool, we were really feeling it. Time to tack back to shore... Carefully.
Last edited by tomodda on Fri Oct 08, 2021 2:00 am, edited 5 times in total.
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Re: Rappahannock Rhapsody

Postby tomodda » Thu Oct 07, 2021 11:11 pm

Ugly, continued:

Now here's where I should explain my guaranteed, never-fail, never in-irons method of tacking in hairy winds. Borrowed liberally from my Hobie Cat days... Head off a tad, gather speed, wait for a smooth(ish) set between waves.. Helm's a-Lee (actually, I just say "tacking"), here we go and LET THE JIB BACKWIND! The jib will push your bow nicely across the eye of the wind, make sure to trim in your lazy sheet (soon to be active) while you're bearing off and... the INSTANT that your mainsail fills in on your new tack, pop your jib across! Loose the (now) windward sheet and set your last bit of trim with the new sheet. Your jib should just pop across into correct trim and off you go! Easy, peasy, just takes some good timing and don't let anything luff or flog.

So here we go on our first tack upwind in the heavy chop. I remind my son that we're making a large tack, 120 degrees (remember, we were sailing a "loose" close reach), and we agree on a shoreside mark for him to steer towards on the new tack. I also remind him that I'm going to backwind the jib and tell him to call it as soon as he's ready.

As I remember it, we crashed over a particularly heavy set of chop and then he tacked. I let the jib backwind and then CLANK! What's that sound?!? It was like someone had dropped a crescent wrench into the bilges, but I didn't have a wrenches onboard and I had no idea what had just happened. All I knew was that something was wrong and I didn't "feel happy." Skipper happiness, is of course the most important safety factor in sailing...

So I left the jib backwinded, told my son to pay off the mainsheet on the new tack and point the tiller at the mainsail. Fortunately, we had practiced heaving-to earlier in the week as we were fooling around in the harbour, so he understood what I wanted. On the negative side, I didn't think to pull the centerboard up, so instead of gently skidding sideways as I tried to figure out what had happened, we started rolling our guts out in the chop. I let that go for some 30 seconds while I looked around.. Couldn't see anything obviously broken, and we weren't taking on water.. Except for the rolling, we were moving as you'd expect while hove too. Rudder and tiller and mast looked OK, me and my son, and our passenger were starting to look green and the dogs were upset. Ok, enough! Sheet that main in, pop the jib over to lee side of the mast, tell my son to steer for the mark onshore and let's get moving. We musta hit a floating branch or something, keep sailing!
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Re: Rappahannock Rhapsody

Postby tomodda » Thu Oct 07, 2021 11:30 pm

More Ugly...

Except something was still not right. In retrospect, I can't believe that I just blindly sailed on. I was seeing the symptoms but not realizing the disease... First, we were wallowing even more on this tack back towards shore, nothing like the speed and "drive" that we had on our outward reach (despite our weight). Then I noticed that the luff of the jib was loose, just a bit... If you've read some of my earlier posts then you know how I HATE scallops, with a passion. Enough to have put $200 worth of gear into a custom jib halyard tensioner. And there was a big ol' scallop (strangely only one) right in front of me, some 3 feet up the luff - so bad that the first six inches of sail cloth behind it was backwinded, fluttering in the wind. WTF?!? I already had my jib halyard iron taut, but I went and hauled on my halyard tensioner as hard as I could.. Nothing, no change. "Weird" is all I thought.

In my defense, we were still crashing thru the chop and I was still taking solid spray in my face while trying to guide my son thru the oncoming sets and puffs, and hiking to keep us flat (our passenger was quite useless in that regard), trying not to fall off or into the boat, and keeping our sails reasonably trimmed. Also... this may say more about me than her, but I felt quite overwhelmed by our passenger's constant stream of questions, unwanted suggestions, and general jabbering, and I didn't have the gumption to tell her to BE QUIET! or words to that effect...This became a real problem a few tacks later, but for now I knew that as we got closer to shore we'd be running into crab pots and cross-chop, so I put my annoyance at the jib luff and our passenger aside and concentrated on navigation and sail trim. The onshore line of crab pots also marks the shoaling areas, too shallow even for the DS, so as soon as we got there we tacked again. Uneventfully this time.
Last edited by tomodda on Fri Oct 08, 2021 2:06 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Rappahannock Rhapsody

Postby tomodda » Fri Oct 08, 2021 12:50 am

Continued Ugly...

Now on our outward tack, I looked back toward my son and asked him how he was holding out... I noticed that he had a lot of weather helm on, normally the tiller is 5ish degrees off center upwind in a good breeze (good weather helm!) , but he was somewhere between 10 and 15 with a good bit of turbulence astern (bad weather helm!) . "I'm fine Dad, but I'm still feeling a lot of weather helm. Didn't you adjust the vang?" Yes, I had.. "Let's all scooch forward, ok?" I said. "How's that?"

No change.. . Oh, I forgot to mention that my son broke the tiller extension earlier in the week and then broke the one I jury rigged out of an axe handle from the local hardware store... Suffice to say we were "dragging ass" for the later half of the week and no way to helm from midship. Anyway, I told him to loose the mainsheet about two inches and that seemed to tame the weather helm some, at further cost of our speed, drive, and pointing ability. By this time, we were starting to reach the rougher waters again and I decided to tack back to shore a bit earlier than last time, again no problem. And this inward tack would fetch us almost to the mouth of Seafood Creek, our destination. So now it was time for some tactical planning...

The creek reaches East to West - more or less and there's a dogleg inside the mouth, and then an area of gusts that we knew from going in two days before. The channel is on the south side of the mouth, with an old wharf at the southern point and riprap all along the leeward shore. North of the channel are some flats that we'd safely sailed across before, fishtraps to avoid, and then shallows close in to the point on the north side of the creek. Said northern point would have the prevailing north wind wrap right around it to the West and intensifying as it gets jammed up into the mouth of the creek. And I could see it happening right on the water, a dark band and extra whitecaps and foam, wrapping around the point, promising a sleigh ride up into the sheltered inner creek and our seafood dock.

"Son, you see that pressure up by the Northside point? The wind is wrapping the point there, just like when we had to beat out of Urbanna - except now it's in our favour! Let's take some short tacks up across the flats, and then ride that wind in at a broad reach, OK? Don't feather, but point up hard for these tacks, then I'll tell you when to bear off, OK?" He understood and acknowledged, and asked me how to handle the fishtraps (Duck under them, don't try to round them to windward, ok?). Our passenger asked me" Why don't you just sail up the channel? " I said" Rocks! " and left it at that, although the truth was my dread of a lee shore, especially one lined with riprap. Why give up searoom when I didn't have to? Besides, the wind shift up ahead was perfect for us. And just maybe I was being too greedy...

Short tack, short tack, no problem except for the boat's strange lethargy and the continued pounding, chop starting to get confused on the flats. And still too much weather helm and the jib all wrong and then I noticed that the entire mainsail above the partners was backwinded! I've not seen that on my DS since I took the damn jackstays off 4 years ago... What the?!? Surely this wind doesn't have that much shear in it? "Trim the main a bit, wouldja? Look up at the top of the sail, that backwind bubble is like a speedbrake, we gotta get rid of it. Trim it out, nevermind the bottom half. I'm going to give us summore vang too, no wonder we're not driving!" And now a sharp little PING sound, like a ball bearing being dropped into an oil pan, I almost didn't hear it.
Last edited by tomodda on Fri Oct 08, 2021 10:55 am, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Rappahannock Rhapsody

Postby Anstigmat » Fri Oct 08, 2021 10:17 am

You sailed in 20-25 without reefing? I reef at like 13.... What am I missing?
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Re: Rappahannock Rhapsody

Postby tomodda » Fri Oct 08, 2021 10:54 am

Uglier...

The next 60 seconds were some of the most intense I've ever had on the water, and not at all in a good way. I had no time to think about the PING. My one, overwhelming thought was WE'RE NOT WEARING LIFEJACKETS! Stupid, stupid me... In our enthusiasm to be off that morning, and packing dogs and people into the boat, and "it's just a short trip," I broke my Golden Rule and didn't insist on everyone wearing lifejackets. Instead, my dog was sleeping on them in the lazarette. What the hell was wrong with me?!? It's not as if I didn't know the conditions that day, and I usually made a habit of wearing my jacket even in a calm. I'm still kicking myself over this stupidity, just writing about it gives me a cold chill. Apologies for belabouring all this about my mindset, but what happened in those 60 seconds was like suddenly realizing that you're walking on a highwire without a net, when all along you had thought you were just lying on the couch.

It started simply enough, we reached the dark band of pressure (or maybe it reached us) and the wind kicked up over 25kts and shifted, as expected. We were on port rack, so tracking away from shore and the shift was heading us, so time for a quick tack. We can figure out what's wrong with the main on the other board. "Let's come about, you ready? <Son nods> Let's go!"

Helm's a-lee, we take a heavy roll, I'm watching the jib... And then I see it, out of the corner of my eye, and the full precariousness and danger of our situation hits me like a bucket-full of ice water. I saw the foot of the mast LURCH in a sickening way that was completely different from its usual working (slight sway) under sail. The movement was almost spastic and out of sync with the rest of the boat. My eyes were immediately drawn to the tabernacle, and I saw THIS:

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Tabernacle Near Disaster
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Where I should have been seeing this:

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Tabernacle normal
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Last edited by tomodda on Fri Oct 08, 2021 12:20 pm, edited 1 time in total.
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Re: Rappahannock Rhapsody

Postby tomodda » Fri Oct 08, 2021 11:46 am

Anstigmat wrote:You sailed in 20-25 without reefing? I reef at like 13.... What am I missing?


You're just missing the amount of (semi) movable ballast that we had. I also reef at 12-13 knots, when I'm single-handing. But today we had 3 onboard , and I had already sailed in similar conditions with just my son earlier in the week. We had reefed, but shook it out later, no sweat. I just knew we could handle 20 knots unreefed.

And I had other controls to de-power the sails - 20:1 Vang, 4:1 outhaul, 3:1 Cunningham, the jib cars, the general bendiness of my mast with a new sail perfectly cut to depower in gusts. I was confident in these controls and used them with no problems till the mast got "wonky." In retrospect, I should have turned back for Urbanna and the breakwater after I heard that first "CLANK," but.. As you can probably tell, overconfidence and testosterone ruled the day!
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Re: Rappahannock Rhapsody

Postby tomodda » Fri Oct 08, 2021 1:13 pm

The Horror... The Horror...

The photo above was taken after the fact, and from the bows facing aft, just for clarity. What I actually saw from my position abaft the mast, was:

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Tabernacle from Aft
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I trust that you, dear reader, can appreciate the subtle horror of the situation. In case you've never seen the mast with the old-style tabernacle, the top and bottom mast pieces are held together like so:

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Not my Mast
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The upper mast is riveted to a shoe (on my boat, riveted AND bolted), the shoe is bolted to the upper leaf, which hinges off the lower leaf, which is in turn bolted to the lower shoe and riveted to the lower mast. A weak point, yes, but once the mast is raised and if the stays are exactly the proper length and well tensioned, then the whole thing is under compression and safe as houses.

I've always joked that the stays on our Daysailer hold the sails up and the mast is just for pretty! And the side-to-side forces on the tabernacle don't matter because the up-and-down forces from the stays hold the whole shoe-hinge-shoe "sandwich" together. Except when they don't, of course... I think I'm done with that joke now, because mast compression and the grace of God (helped out by a double-shift of angels) were the only thing holding my mast up. Somehow both bolts holding the shoe to the tabernacle had shorn clean off:

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Broken Bolts
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As you can see, once the shoe bolts broke, the heel of the mast slid almost all the way off the top of the tabernacle. The only thing holding it was the very top edge of bronze footblock on the port side. The only thing holding the footblock to the cuddy roof were two #10 bronze screws and a big old piece of tropical hardwood that I had used as a backer. And I could see both the roof and the footblock flexing as we continued crashing thru the chop... My mind's eye could clearly see the final bit of mast shoe sliding off the tabernacle, gouging into the roof (if not crashing thru)... the immense moment arm of the mast no longer under compression... stays snapping and/or chain plates failing... mast going over, stays whipping around, maybe taking someone's head off... mast in the water, drag, next wave hits us and over we go... a tangle of lines, sails, equipment, a washing machine of crashing waves. Just a few more punches from the chop would do it, and my premonition would become awful reality. Worse was...

NO LIFEJACKETS! My brain just kept screaming that. Everyone aboard was a strong swimmer (me the weakest), but the capsize I was seeing would likely not have survivors. Maybe the Golden...
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Re: Rappahannock Rhapsody

Postby tomodda » Fri Oct 08, 2021 2:47 pm

Recovery..

Somehow, my inner Drill Sergeant, or maybe memories of my own Dad, took over and I started rapping out orders, repeated for emphasis: "Head UP!! Luff her, Luff her! Let go all sheets. Let 'em FLY, let' em FLY! I'm dropping sails, jib first! Hold her into the wind!"

Thinking about it later, I was very thankful that my son didn't question why I was suddenly changing our plan, he just followed orders quickly and perfectly. He even dropped the engine and started it up, a little detail I'd forgotten. I was thankful for the jib downhaul I'd rigged. For all the times it's snagged during jib hoists, this time it saved us.... I brought the jib down almost instantly, greatly reducing the risk of the boat falling off and filling up the mainsail again. I was thankful for all the times I've sailed up to the dock, my son and I were both quite practiced in fast sail takedowns. Letting all fly was the only thing different about my orders, normally I avoid flogging the sails. But I wanted to kill as much lateral pressure as possible and FAST. Now with the jib down, I loosed the main halyard and pulled the sail down hand-over-hand, not caring as the boom crashed onto the aft deck. Thankful again for my insistence on slugs, not a luff rope, for my new main. I checked the tabernacle again, no more movement, the heel of the mast was still jammed up against the foot block. Old Crittenden blocks from eBay, I'm thankful for marine bronze, thankful that I'd overbuilt the backing plates! We were still pounding hard and mast was still swaying dangerously, but I'll take it over the sheer panic I had while the sails were still up.

Immediate emergency over, I noticed two things - our passenger, I'll call her M, was yapping at a mile a minute (questions, suggestions, why?, what?, how? etc), and my sleeping dog had magically transported herself out of the lazarette and onto my son's lap, where she was now nervously scanning the horizon.

To be continued...
Next chapter : 0.3HP Adventures
Last edited by tomodda on Fri Oct 08, 2021 7:38 pm, edited 4 times in total.
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Re: Rappahannock Rhapsody

Postby GreenLake » Fri Oct 08, 2021 3:38 pm

Amazing story.

Nothing wrong with the basic picture: it largely accounts for static loads, although, especially with a strong vang, if it's not attached to the mast foot itself, you do have a horizontal load component forward. Add to that the dynamic load from the chop. . .

From the picture it looks like the halyards may have helped keeping the mast at least partially on the tabernacle.

Now, I'm waiting for the part how you got home in 25kt winds with .3HP.
~ green ~ lake ~ ~
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Re: Rappahannock Rhapsody

Postby tomodda » Fri Oct 08, 2021 3:44 pm

@GL: The vang is attached to the hinge of the tabernacle, via a D-Bracket, see my "Tabernacle from Aft" photo above. The vang is the blue and white line, going thru the cuddy roof. Yes, there's a load forward, but it was the side-to-side load that had me in a cold sweat at that moment. I'll theorize on what caused the failure later, and am curious to know your opinion.
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Re: Rappahannock Rhapsody

Postby GreenLake » Sat Oct 09, 2021 6:13 am

Tom, we always talk about as the loads on the lower part of a mast being in pure compression (hence, compression post).

That's true only below the partners, which transfer any horizontal loads to the deck. The tabernacle being above the partners by a bit, you'd expect there to be some moment on the compression post, but because the distance to the bottom end of the compression post is so much more, the lever arm means that any horizontal forces at the bottom end of the compression post are very small, and the post is easily prevented from rotating. And the distance between partners and tabernacle is very short, so the bending moment for the top bit of that compression post is also small.

When sailing, the culprit is the boom (other than dynamic or sail loading that may act on the mast directly). The vang, if not rigidly attached to the mast itself will pull the boom forward. In your case, that force was held by the two bolts between tabernacle and mast, because the vang attaches to the tabernacle, as you point out. Did they corrode? I don't think it would have taken much movement to shear them off, once compromised.

And any wind force in the sail would push the boom laterally; in alternating directions when tacking. The sail track also transfers some of those side loads from the main. The jib, being attached where the stays meet, should not contribute, because any side loads up there are transferred to the stays.

The top part of the mast is free to move. With variable loads from slamming and wind it would want to pivot the mast around the hounds. However, if you visualize the mast hanging horizontal, suspended at the hounds, the upper part might partially balance the moments from the lower part, because they move in opposite directions.

Now, one moment that is unique to the top of the mast is the load from the leech of the main. That would pull the tip back and adds to the moment from the boom pushing the lower part forward. Then there are slamming loads from the weight of the boom (and of course the lower part of the mast, but the boom is a lot of mass concentrated at one location and is like a little battering ram when you slam your boat into a wave).

You were reporting on some noises you heard, but I can't see how they figure into this.

You also reported that even with the mast not dropping below the level of the tabernacle, you could no longer tension your jib. The weather helm, of course comes from the jib not pulling the bow down, if it's badly trimmed. However, you may have to help me here, the mast being offset a couple inches at the bottom shouldn't affect the distance between deck and hounds that much. (The cosine at the angle should still be very close to 1.) If you have a halyard tensioner, it should have been able to make up for the forestay sag, unless the hounds moved enough to make the luff longer than the remaining distance.

Is there something else that was going on?
~ green ~ lake ~ ~
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Re: Rappahannock Rhapsody

Postby GreenLake » Sat Oct 09, 2021 6:16 am

You are a very effective skipper. Your passenger clearly felt no danger, because she knew you could handle it. People who don't know anything about boats also can't see the kind of "scenarios" that you can. I'm sure she did not envision the possibility of the rig coming down and what that might have meant, or you guys going swimming.
~ green ~ lake ~ ~
GreenLake
 
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