Single handed raise or lower mast with tabernacle

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Single handed raise or lower mast with tabernacle

Postby spoke36 » Wed Oct 23, 2019 10:11 pm

I have forgotten how to raise (or lower) the tabernacle hinged mast on my Day Sailer 1.

If I have help, I can raise the mast and set it on the tabernacle and my helper can insert the pins and attach the shrouds. I want to be able to raise the mast (and lower it) single handedly. A few weeks ago I lifted and erected the mast placing it on the connector; I had a helper. I found that my new shrouds were too short so I made new tangs and want to try out the rigging before launching. My helper is not available.

Today I tried to raise the mast from the front of the boat (boat is on a trailer in my yard) but was not able to figure out a way to walk the mast up starting from having the front pin in place ands having the top of the 20 foot section resting on a 6 foot step ladder. Using some kind of Y-shaped contraption, I could only get the tip of the mast 10-12 feet off the ground from the original 6 feet. I tried putting an intermediate stationary crutch closer to the bow but the tabernacle connection rises up. I am not athletic enough to run or jump onto the deck (a 5 food jump is WAY beyond my ability).

Perhaps I should try raising from the rear? I do not see an easy attachment for a gin pole or a block and tackle.

Surely people who trailer their Day Sailer have to raise the mast to be able to sail and lower the mast to be able to take the boat away. Can this be done single handedly?
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Re: Single handed raise or lower mast with tabernacle

Postby Alan » Thu Oct 24, 2019 12:21 am

It probably can. My technique usually involves my crew, but I've done it myself. With the mast horizontal, resting on the tabernacle and transom, I install the aft hinge pin through the lower and upper halves of the mast hinge, then install the cotter pin in the hinge pin.

I then tie a line around the mast just above the shrouds. The line runs forward to a turning block which is lashed to a forward cleat. I then boost the mast to nearly vertical while standing in the cockpit. In the meantime, my crew is tugging on the line, keeping tension on it and adding some lift. Her main function at that point is to belay the mast so it doesn't fall, and then to pull or slack off while I line up the remaining hinge pin.

I've done this myself by boosting the mast with my hands, then pushing it upward with a shoulder while tugging on the belay line with one hand and stuffing the forward hinge pin into position with the other hand. Is it easy? Nope, but I can make it work, and I'm a skinny senior citizen.

If memory serves, some DSIs have a chock forward, rather than cleats as with the DSII. In that case, you might need to install a padeye or something similar to serve as an attachment point for the turning block.
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Re: Single handed raise or lower mast with tabernacle

Postby GreenLake » Thu Oct 24, 2019 3:27 am

I have a DS1 with a keel-stepped mast that I raise and lower single handed all the time.

My boat has a "hinged sleeve" into which I insert the mast foot, so the first part of raising is the same as with a tabernacle, except, the lever arm is poorer by the extra 3-4' of mast length. I do this part, standing in the cockpit. (Lift up to shoulder height, step under it, then push up and walk forward until vertical). I control the mast entirely at this stage.

The next stage is unique to my boat, because, with the mast foot still captive in the sleeve, I lower the mast to the mast-step on the keel, after which I can let go.

With a deck stepped mast, you'll need something like Alan's setup, where you attach the shrouds and then have a line that can put tension on the rigging when vertical. If you have the strength and reach, you can push the mast up from the cockpit, like I do, and then, when it's vertical pull that forward line tight.

If you don't have the strength, or the reach, you can build a simple tripod. I built one for my boat to use one year when I had shoulder problems.

Here's how it works:
  1. Each leg is 6-7' long and made from 1"x2" hardwood and the apex is formed by a short bit of 2"x2" to which each leg is fixed with a simple hinge.
  2. Each leg has a "forked end" with a pin, so each leg can be pinned to a chainplate or the stem fitting. However, that works best for my boat, where the mast is free standing after it's been raised. Perhaps make an L-shaped fork out of metal (aluminum is easy to work with) to go over the chainplates, but so that you can leave the shrouds attached (or can attach them with the tripod still standing).
  3. Suspended from the apex there's a block. A line from there goes to whichever point of the mast will be at the height of your tripod when vertical. On my boat, that was the mast ring, but remember, my mast is 3-4' longer. So you may need to add an eyestrap.
  4. The other slide of that line goes to some purchase which goes parallel to the forward leg. I had a 6:1 purchase from some big-box store that I used, but you can make your own using any blocks that you have lying around. (There's no real need for a winch here, the force required isn't that much, but some people like to use the trailer winch or even a temporary deck mounted one.)
  5. The tail for the purchase exits at the bottom of the forward leg and is lead back across the deck so I can pull on it standing in the cockpit. (I use whatever cleat on deck is available)
  6. I lay the mast horizontal, pointing back, fix the tripod and attach the line to the ring/eystrap.
  7. I stand in the cockpit and pull on the tail of the purchase to hoist the mast vertically. By standing in the cockpit I can help steady the mast, if needed.
  8. When vertical, I belay the hoisting line and attach the shrouds and the forestay.
  9. Last, I would remove the tripod. (On my boat the order of the last two steps is reversed, because after it's vertical, I lower it down onto the mast step, then remove the tripod and then do the shrouds).
This system works well; even a short/small person can work it. The trick is to make the connections for the feet of the tripod really convenient. I used bolts with wing-nuts as my 'pins' and that proved to be a pain. It was so much slower, compared to simply muscling the mast upright, that I gave up on the system and now focus on maintaining my strength so I can do this without injury.
~ green ~ lake ~ ~
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Re: Single handed raise or lower mast with tabernacle

Postby RobH912 » Thu Oct 24, 2019 7:11 am

Here is a YouTube video of a single handed tabernacle mast raising on a DS3 that might provide some ideas.

https://youtu.be/O5jm6FWP7jU

The key to this approach seems to be the line attached to one of the mast rings & also forward at the bow that then gets cinched up once mast is upright allowing for 2nd tabernacle pin and then front stay to be attached.

I have not tried the approach myself.
Rob

DS1 #14061
DS1 #2444
Cape Cod
Eastham, MA
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Re: Single handed raise or lower mast with tabernacle

Postby jalmeida51 » Thu Oct 24, 2019 8:48 am

I use a mast crutch about 6 feet in length. It is attached to the transman using a set of pintles and gudgeons. T he mast crutch gets the mast raised at a good angle. I attached a line to my jib halyard run it through a block attached at the stem head back to the mast. The shrouds are loose. The rear tabernacle pin is installed. If there is any amount of wind the boat should be heading into the wind. This will prevent the mast from whipping out of control. When raising the mast do it in one clean movement, don't stop half way up. When the mast is up secure the line attached to the halyard to a cleat. Then you can install the forward pin.
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Re: Single handed raise or lower mast with tabernacle

Postby tomodda » Thu Oct 24, 2019 11:44 am

Hi @spoke36:

Lots of advice on mast raising, it's always so much "fun." My $0.02:

-The mast is pretty light, the problem is controlling the lever-arm - it's an unwieldy 20-foot long stick!

-Make sure that the side stays are well attached, never raise the mast without both side stays in place. It WILL fall over - sideways.

-I raise the mast while standing inside the boat. My solution for hopping in/out of boat while she's on the trailer is a small footstool. I have a simple plastic one from home depot, about 2 ft high, which I toss into the trunk of my car. Alternatively there are folding ones. Makes life a LOT easier.

-First thing you do is raise the mast off the cradle and shift it aft. You can do this single handed, standing near or on the thwart. Then pin the mast to the tabernacle, with mast lying on transom. You can't lie it RIGHT on the transom, because the mast will catch on the cuddy. You need to prop the transom-end of the mast up about 2 feet. I do it with four seat cushions piled up, you could do it with a crutch or even a sailbag. But mast has to be raised off the transom a bit.

-Once pinned, I put the mast up by hand... stand behind the centerboard, hoist it up onto my shoulder, walk forward, and then I step up onto the thwart. On a good day, I just hoist it the whole way onto my shoulder while standing on the thwart. Then I push the mast into place, with the forward pin lined up. Once it's in place, I can hold it there with one hand, freeing my other arm for the next steps.

-I use the jib halyard to secure the mast, and - if needed - to help me pull it up. I don't use a block at the bow, instead I simply clip the jib halyard to the stemhead - thru the aft-most hole. Same place where you normally clip the tack of your jib. In other words, instead of attaching the jib halyard to the head of the jib, I attach it to the bowstem. I pull on the free end of the halyard, same as if I'm raising the jib. Of course, this doesn't work unless you are standing in the boat and the mast is already up on your shoulder (angles). Actually, I'll only use the jib halyard to help me raise the mast if I'm feeling weak that day, the real importance of the halyard is for the next step.....

-One the mast is raised, using my free arm, I pull in all the slack possible on the jib halyard and cleat it down. This HAS to be secure - cleat to a horn cleat, not a cam-cleat. Once cleated, I can let go of the mast, the halyard will temporarily act as my fore-stay.

-Now I pin the forward pin of the tabernacle and the mast is relatively secure. At this point, I want to get even more slack out of the jib halyard, tighten it down as much as possible. The procedure is the same as tightening the halyard with the jib on it. I "sweat" the halyard, while keeping tension on it the whole time, its a two-handed operation. As a precaution, Ii'll keep my shoulder close behind the mast, but the forces you are exerting on the mast are DOWN and FOREWARD, so it will stay in place. Once it's good and tight, I cleat the halyard down again.

-Now I hop out of the boat, walk to the bow and "simply" pin the forestay to the stemhead and release the halyard. I put "simply" in quotes because if the jib halyard isn't tight then the forestay won't reach! This is the only hard part of the whole procedure. I usually just pull on the halyard from the bow end (while it's still clipped in, of course) to get out that last bit of slack, then I contort my other hand to bring the forestay into place and slide the pin in at the same time. I have big hands, it works, but barely. The other options are to either get back in the boat and tighten the jib halyard some MORE, or use the main halyard. For that, I get back in the boat, tie off the main halyard as per normal, and then carry the head end of the main halyard with me to the bow. Then I pull on THAT as hard as I can, getting the mast forward a bit, and then pin the forestay.

-For what it's worth, I clip my forestay to a side halyard while the mast is down. Much easier than letting it flop around.

-Taking the mast down is the reverse - Clip the jib halyard to the stem, cleat it off, unpin the forestay, clip it to the sidestay, take out the forward pin on the tabernacle, let the mast down to your shoulder, then either walk it back or just put it down onto your arms then the transom. For me, the hardest part is getting the rear pin out, somehow it's always jammed. My beloved 2-lb deadblow mallet comes in mighty handy for these occasions!

Well, that's it, hope it's helpful. Bottom line, use your jib halyard, walk the mast up from inside the boat.

Best,

Tom
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Re: Single handed raise or lower mast with tabernacle

Postby spoke36 » Thu Oct 24, 2019 9:56 pm

Thanks, Tom.
(1) Propping up the top of the mast on a 6 foot step ladder located behind the boat,
(2) pinning the bottom of the mast to the rear of the tabernacle and
(3) attaching the two side stays and
(4) then having a line to the mast at the large spreaders then connected to a block on the deck and brought back to the block used for the main sheet worked for me as I
(5) lifted the mast while standing inside the boat.
(6) I secured the line from the mast through the block on the deck to cleats and
(7) then attached the forestay. (It is definitely possible to pause for a moment after the forestay is attached; this process took about 5 minutes up to this point).
(8) Finally I twisted the screw jack to raise the bottom of the mast and
(9) secured the spreaders against the stays before
(10) making the final tightening by twisting the screw jack to raise the mast and put proper tension on the stays.

I am going to need some "prop" or platform about 6 feet off the ground to allow me to raise and lower the mast when not having a step latter around. I made a "Y" out of 1 inch PVC pipe that might work if there was soft earth or sand. If the mast were to be left on the rear deck without a higher resting place, the tabernacle would rise off the pin on the chine.

I do not have a support on the back of the boat or trailer to mount a platform to get the top of the mast to be above the cabin top. Such an item could make trailering the mast and boom easier than trying to strap the mast and boom across the boat as I have done so far. And I think I need a sturdy webbing or rope to keep the boat attached to the trailer when encountering uneven road surfaces.
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Re: Single handed raise or lower mast with tabernacle

Postby GreenLake » Thu Oct 24, 2019 10:18 pm

Get a pair of pintles (those are the pins on the rudder that hook into to gudgeons). Mount them on a board that is about 3' long (a simple 1x4 will do for this). Notch a Y at the top.

Hook that into the gudgeons as support. Works for trailering as well as to get the mast level for raising it.

(There's no need for using really massive lumber, even a 2x4 is overkill, but if you'd like to use it as part of your winter storage, then seal it in epoxy and paint/varnish it against UV).
681

(That's not the best picture, but I rarely photograph the boat when put away).
~ green ~ lake ~ ~
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Re: Single handed raise or lower mast with tabernacle

Postby shroomer » Fri Jan 10, 2020 12:18 pm

GreenLake wrote:Get a pair of pintles (those are the pins on the rudder that hook into to gudgeons). Mount them on a board that is about 3' long (a simple 1x4 will do for this). Notch a Y at the top.

Hook that into the gudgeons as support. Works for trailering as well as to get the mast level for raising it.


I just purchased a DSII and was wondering how you attach the other end of the mast while trailering. Does it attach to something on the trailer or onto the boat? If it attaches to the trailer, is there a need to support it part way or is it strong enough to travel held at two ends?
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Re: Single handed raise or lower mast with tabernacle

Postby Alan » Fri Jan 10, 2020 2:35 pm

I have a support like GreenLake described at the transom. The forward end of the mast rests on a U-shaped bracket at the top of the winch post (which is fairly long). I've got about 4000 miles of trailering with this setup and haven't had any apparent problems.
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Re: Single handed raise or lower mast with tabernacle

Postby GreenLake » Fri Jan 10, 2020 3:14 pm

In addition to the two support points as described by Alan, I have a third support at the mast partners. With a keel-stepped mast, I can insert a mast support there, so my mast ends up supported in three places.
~ green ~ lake ~ ~
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Re: Single handed raise or lower mast with tabernacle

Postby spoke36 » Fri Jan 10, 2020 4:24 pm

I purchased two pintles on eBay (intended for a Hobie) for about $20 min the Fall of 2019. The two pintles fit perfectly into the gudgeons on (used by the Day Sailer rudder) already attached to the transom. I used a 4 foot 2x4. I have attached a picture of the mast support in the back of my Day Sailer. You should use some sort of stainless steel safety pin like device to prevent the pintle from "jumping" out of the gudgeons when the boat is being trailered.
Attachments
Day Sailer Mast Support.jpg
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Re: Single handed raise or lower mast with tabernacle

Postby Alan » Fri Jan 10, 2020 8:02 pm

Good point about the pin. One of my pintles has a small hole in it for a pin. GL, I think you have another type of security device to keep your pintles in the gudgeons, but I can't remember what it is?
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Re: Single handed raise or lower mast with tabernacle

Postby GreenLake » Sat Jan 11, 2020 2:51 am

For keeping the pintles in the gudgeons while on the water, I have two devices. On L bracket that can rotate out of the way to allow the rudder to be removed and one SS strip, bent so that that forms a shallow V with the rudder head, with the tip resting against the pintle. It has to be pushed in towards the rudder head to allow the gudgeon to slide along the pintle.

For trailering, I do not rely on either of these. I tie a line from stern cleat to stern cleat, with one turn around the mast. I also duplicate that with a long bungee. The line ensures that the mast support can't jump out, and the bungee makes sure the whole thing doesn't continually bounce while on the road (there's always a small amount of slack in the line that would allow play).

Further: I strap the mast to the mast support with a PU loop (or short bungee) attached to a screw on either side of the support. I don't mind the extra minute strapping things down even for a short haul. Peace of mind.
~ green ~ lake ~ ~
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Re: Single handed raise or lower mast with tabernacle

Postby GreenLake » Sat Jan 11, 2020 3:01 am

Pintles are fairly generic, the main differences are diameter and the type of connection: some have a flat strap and are designed to be attached pointing upwards on a transom, some have U shaped straps that are meant to go around a rudder head (they can be screwed in, or through-bolted, depending on how the hole patterns line up). Those are mounted facing down on the rudder head.

For the mast support you want the former, but mount them pointing down on the support. For a replacement rudder, you want the latter. Just be sure that the pin diameter matches and (for a rudder) that the U is wide enough to fit your rudder head.
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